Choreographer Camille A. Brown Brought The Dance To ‘Choir Boy’ And Representation To Broadway

“Nearly 10 million people saw Camille A. Brown’s work one night last year. Let that sink in. On a single evening - Easter Sunday 2018 - Brown's choreography for NBC's Jesus Christ Superstar Live In Concert reached a number of viewers unimaginable in the dance, theater and concert halls of New York, and yet an accomplishment this year in one of those very theaters has made an impact quite possibly of equal or greater impact. Brown's choreography for Tarell Alvin McCraney's play-with-music Choir Boy has been nominated for a 2019 Tony Award "

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Gwendolyn Baum
The First Black Woman Choreographer Nominated for a Tony in Over Two Decades: Camille Brown

“On the last day of April 2019, Gayle King boarded the stage to announce the first eight Tony nominations with Broadway’s Brandon Victor Dixon and Bebe Neuwirth. As the nominations rolled further the audience applauded with excitement and curiosity for the announcements to come. Then the 2019 nominations for Best Choreography rolled around and for the first time in over twenty years a Black female choreographer was announced, Camille Brown. The last Black female nominated for a Best Choreography Tony Award was Marlies Yearby for Rent in 1996”

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Gwendolyn Baum
THE NATIONAL- 'Ink': Celebration of African-American dance makes its Middle East debut

A celebration of African-American culture is coming to Abu Dhabi today.

As part of New York University’s Art Centre season, the immersive dance spectacle Ink will make its Middle Eastern debut, featuring themes stemming from both history and today’s news.

Choreographed by New Yorker Camille Brown, who will also perform with her cast on stage, the fast-moving, hour-long production moves through various dance suites that touch upon myriad strands of the African-American experience, from migration to self-empowerment and fellowship.

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Jordan Lugenbeel
ABU DHABI WORLD- These dancers hope to leave a lasting impression

The arts are often talked about in the context of being a platform for dialogue, of creating a space where people – no matter their age, background or beliefs – can enjoy a shared experience that could lead to an open discussion.

When artists create and perform, they generate a wave of self-expression and emotion that they hope in turn will cause a ripple effect that leaves the audience reflecting on their work.

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Jordan Lugenbeel
FJORD- And still I rise: Camille A. Brown writes a new narrative of blackness with “ink”

Recently at the Joyce Theater in New York, Camille A. Brown and Dancers presented “ink,” the final installation in her trilogy of concert works: “Mr. TOL E. RAncE” (2012) explored minstrelsy past and present and the mask that black people wear merely to survive in the world; “Black Girl: Linguistic Play” (2015), featuring an all female cast, took us behind the mask and revealed the beautiful complexity of black female youth and joy. It could be said that “ink” is the period on the sentence, or more apropos, a ribbon that ties all three in a bow.

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Jordan Lugenbeel
PITTSBURGH CURRENT- Dance Work ‘Ink’ Explores Black Life And Black Identity At August Wilson Cultural Center

The third work in her trilogy on black identity, Camille A. Brown’s ink (2017) follows in the dance steps of previous works Mr. TOL E. RAncE (2012), about minstrelsy and BLACK GIRL: Linguistic Play (2015), about Black womanhood. The hourlong dance-theater piece will be performed by Brown’s New York-based Camille A. Brown & Dancers, March 9 and 10 at Downtown’s August Wilson Cultural Center.

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Jordan Lugenbeel
PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER- Camille A. Brown & Dancers rewrite the Black narrative with ink

There are no tutus, leotards, or ballet buns in the Camille A. Brown & Dancers (CABD) production of ink. Instead, dancers wear untucked, button-down shirts, cargo shorts, tank tops, and yoga pants, all meant to designate their roles as everyday people on the street. By staying grounded in reality, the new dance theater show at the August Wilson Cultural Center (March 9-10) explores how small interactions and relationships contribute to Black empowerment.

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Jordan Lugenbeel
DANCE TABS- Play Without Words

The choreographer Camille A. Brown has a rare talent – the ability to make you understand a situation or state of mind through dance. And it’s not easy; how many choreographers try to telescope stories or relay messages and either leave you scratching your head or resort to a vocabulary so obvious and didactic it feels like a lecture? Brown triumphs where others fail; she has found that sweet spot, the place where meaning and movement meet. And she does it with humor and warmth.

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Jordan Lugenbeel
THE NEW YORK TIMES- Review: Camille A. Brown’s Rousing and Incisive ‘ink’

The choreographer Camille A. Brown often talks about the struggles she faced with body image as a young dancer, when teachers told her that she didn’t have the “ideal” dancer’s physique. I hope those people have been following her career, because she has been proving them wrong for about two decades, and continued to do so on Tuesday at the Joyce Theater with the New York premiere of “ink.”

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Jordan Lugenbeel
INFINITEBODY- Camille A. Brown's superheroes write their names in "ink"

Do not trifle with Camille A. Brown. The woman knows her mind, and her secure creative imprint has been felt, now, not only on dance stages but on television and Broadway. Ask her a question--as folks did during her audience dialogue at The Joyce's opening night for ink--and, without any hesitation, you get Direct Camille. Her movement might appear, to some, a chain of several interlocking dance genres, but it is not thoughtlessly or simplistically so. Nor can we shove it under a safe, defining label. What to call what she crafts in her work? "It's me," Brown says.

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Jordan Lugenbeel
PLAYBILL- Watch Oscar Winner Tarell Alvin McCraney and the Company of His Choir Boy Talk Opening Night on Broadway

Tarell Alvin McCraney has won an Oscar, a McArthur Genius Grant, and a PEN Award. He is the playwriting chair at the Yale School of Drama. And, as of January 8, he has officially made his Broadway debut with his Choir Boy. The writer behind In the Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue(on which the Oscar-winning Moonlight is based), The Brother/Sister PlaysWig Out!, and more brings his singular voice to Manhattan Theatre Club’s main stage at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre with the play that marked his first commission out of graduate school.

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Jordan Lugenbeel
THEATER PIZZAZZ- Chior Boy – Joyous

Extremely talented Jeremy Pope as Pharus, is a golden voiced tenor whose bright eyes are always facing up to heaven and has much to say as he makes his way toward graduation as leader of the gospel choir at Charles R. Drew Prep School for Boys.

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Jordan Lugenbeel