Videos

 

TED - NEW SECOND LINE

Inspired by the events of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Camille A. Brown choreographed "New Second Line," a celebration of the culture of New Orleans and the perseverance of Black people in the midst of devastation. The performance borrows its name from the energetic, spirited people who follow the traditional brass band parades for weddings, social events and, most notably, funerals in New Orleans. "It honors our ability to rise and keep rising," Brown says. (Music includes "New Second Line" by Los Hombres Calientes featuring Kermit Ruffins)

TED - A VISUAL HISTORY OF SOCIAL DANCE IN 25 MOVES

Why do we dance? African-American social dances started as a way for enslaved Africans to keep cultural traditions alive and retain a sense of inner freedom. They remain an affirmation of identity and independence. In this electric demonstration, packed with live performances, choreographer, educator and TED Fellow Camille A. Brown explores what happens when communities let loose and express themselves by dancing together.